European Trade Union Institute, ETUI.

Accueil > ReformsWatch > Croatia > INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS IN CROATIA ‐ BACKGROUND SUMMARY

INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS IN CROATIA ‐ BACKGROUND SUMMARY

  • On average trade union membership in Croatia is around 25.8% (ILO 2018) of the workforce and is in decline. 
  • In the collective bargaining system in Croatia, only those trade unions which have fulfilled  the representativeness criteria may take part in collective agreements and in strike actions  connected to these collective agreements.
  • There are an estimated 651 trade unions in Croatia. This includes: 331 trade unions at the  national level (i.e. operating in at least two counties); 298 trade unions at a county level (in  only one county) and 22 trade union confederations, out of which 4 are representative  (associations of higher level, 2013 data). These are: the Union of Autonomous Trade Unions  of Croatia (Savez samostalnih sindikata Hrvatske) with 123,465 members in 23 affiliated  unions; the Independent Trade Unions of Croatia (Nezavisni hrvatski sindikati)  with 116,837  members in 59 affiliated unions; the Association of Croatian Trade Unions (Matica Hrvatskih  sindikata) with 57,990 members in 10 unions; and the Workers Trade Union Association of  Croatia (Hrvatska udruga radničkih sindikata) with 54,009 members in 57 unions.
  • On the employers’ side there is only one representative association: the Croatian Employers’  Association (Hrvatska udruga poslodavaca). 
  • A high level of trade union membership was evident at the beginning of the 1990s under the  socialist regime in power. Membership is now in decline, however, in large part due to the  retirement of older trade unions members and the lack of engagement in trade unions by  younger workers. A study by Grgurev and Vukorepa (2015, p403) indicated that trade union  leaders expect the decline in membership to continue, mainly because of further moves to enact legislation that will further flexibilise the labour market.
  • Other research (Bagić) dealing with the Croatian collective bargaining system showed that in 2014 (end of June until beginning of November) around 570 collective agreements were in  application. In Croatia, most of the collective agreements have been concluded at the level of a single employer (enterprise level collective bargaining) as company collective  agreements – 90% (Grgurev, 2013, p103).
  • Of the 570 agreements analysed in the study, only 16 were branch collective agreements,  among which 9 were concluded in the private sector (4 of them were extended) and seven in  the public sector. The extension of the application of two collective agreements (for the  catering industry and construction) covered around 141,000 of employees in the private  sector. Nevertheless, the rights of more than one‐half of all the workers employed in this  sector, around 209,000 persons were regulated only by company collective agreements.  Around 26,000 of those employed in the real sector were covered both by company and  branch collective agreements. The rights of around 235,000 employed in the real sector were  regulated by company collective agreement. Therefore, for the valid analysis of the collective  bargaining system in Croatia, reliable data on company collective agreement is urgently needed. 
  • There are three levels of collective bargaining and collective agreements in operation: 1)  company collective agreements (binding on a single employer); 2) sectoral or branch  collective agreements (concluded on the level of a sector or a branch of an industry and  binding on all employers in such a sector or in the closely connected branch of the industry)  and national collective agreements concluded on a national level and binding on all  employers (no local level collective agreements).  In Croatia there are no local level collective  agreements comparable to those existence in some other countries.
  • The collective bargaining coverage in 2010 (there are no recent data) was estimated at 61%.  This is mostly concentrated in the public and state sector, although the rate is declining.  Collective bargaining coverage in the private sector is much lower.
  • A tripartite committee, the Economic and Social Council (Gospodarsko‐socijalno vijeće) exists  at the national level and operates at the regional (county) level, comprising representatives  of employers’ organisations, trade unions and government. The committee also acts as  an advisory body to the government. The committee is an important body for discussing  employment and labour law issues, as well as social security. However, there are consistent  complaints, mostly from the trade unions, that the actual extent of social dialogue is limited. 
  • The main aim of collective bargaining, and the purpose of reaching collective agreements, is  to regulate working conditions especially salaries. A secondary aim is to regulate the  contractual relationship between the parties 
  • The Croatian labour law system allows for the extension of the application of a collective agreement. This makes it possible to deviate from the principle of voluntary stipulation of a  collective agreement, since it extends the application to workers who have not taken part in  collective bargaining or have joined as a party to the agreement. In the last twenty years or  so there were only twenty three decisions rendered by the Minister in charge of labour on  the extension of the application of a collective agreement. The extensions exclusively cover  sectoral agreements, with the main sectors involved being commerce, tourism and  hospitality, construction, mining. 
  • Until 1995 local trade union bodies were the only organisations legally entitled to represent employees at the workplace. Works councils and workers’ meetings were introduced by the  Labour Act in 1995 and, after the introduction of workers’ representatives in company  advisory board, these represents the main form of worker participation in Croatia. Works  councils are responsible for information and consultation, but they are not allowed to  conduct collective bargaining. Since 2016 the ministry in charge of labour runs a registry of  works council in Croatia, and records show that in 2017 there were just 173 works councils  registered.
Back