European Trade Union Institute, ETUI.

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Work-related cancer: emerging from obscurity

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  • Hesamag #20 - Migrant workers in Fortress Europe

    Migrant workers in Fortress Europe

    The number of legally resident migrants stands at over 22 million, but the number of Europe’s “undocumented” migrants, whose status is precarious and whose rights in many areas are limited as a result, is much harder to determine. These migrants are often forced to tolerate adverse working conditions; since they are discriminated against in the labour market, both male and female migrant workers are pushed into low-skill industries and professions that are more hazardous to health and less well-paid than other jobs, a situation that is justified by racist stereotypes and assumptions.

    N° 20

  • HesaMag #19 - Working behind bars

    Working behind bars

    This 19th edition of HesaMag, the ETUI magazine on health and safety at work, focuses on working conditions behind bars. To work in prison is to work on the margins of society. To work as a prisoner and to work with prisoners is a very ordinary job in terms of the actual actions and tasks being performed. But the context in which the work is being performed is radically different to the “outside” world. This issue is rarely addressed in occupational health.

    N° 19

  • HesaMag 18

    Work-related cancer: emerging from obscurity

    Cancer is responsible for 1.3 million deaths in the European Union each year. According to the International Labour Organisation (ILO), more than 100,000 of these deaths are attributable to exposure to carcinogens during a victim’s working life, meaning that nearly 8% of all cancer deaths in Europe are work-related. Yet such occupational factors only rarely attract media attention. Even more surprisingly, the campaigns rolled out by public institutions or private organisations dedicated to fighting cancer almost never speak of such causes.

Previous issues